Improving learner outcomes

Testimonials

The following testimonials are a selection of comments provided when participants complete their post-course evaluation, and evaluate the success of their goals 90 days after passing their course.

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The setting of these goals enabled me to focus on the areas in which the child needed support and to set aside time to work individually with him. I have used this in my practice with other children, identifying areas which need support and providing short one to one small group sessions to address these.

Teaching Assistant
Speech, Language and Communication Needs

I have enjoyed and found it very useful hearing other peoples’ goals and interventions and sharing ideas and hope to continue with learning more about others’ strategies.

Learning Support Assistant (LSA)
Understanding and Supporting Behaviour

I would recommend this training to anyone who is currently working with individuals with autistic spectrum disorders. It has provided me with a lot of factual information, such as the characteristics of ASD, and the behaviours of these characteristics and their causes. I particularly enjoyed the intervention module as it provided me with a wide range of strategies and intervention packages – some of these I had never heard of and am very excited to use within my own practice!

Early Years Practitioner
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Having an understanding of attachment theory and how disrupted attachment experiences can manifest in different attachment styles and behaviour is incredibly important when working with children, particularly when those children have experienced trauma. Applying this lens to the behaviour I see in the classroom, enables me to understand my student's behaviour as communication. When I recognise behaviour as a student communicating a need, I am able to reflect on how best to respond to and support the student. Remembering that children have often developed their insecure attachment styles in response to neglectful, inconsistent or abusive care also helps me to maintain empathy for my students and recognise that their behaviour is often not wilfully disruptive or defiant but is reflective of how they had their needs met (or not) in their early years.

Teacher
Attachment and Trauma

The three key things that I have learned are the difference between dyspraxia and developmental coordination disorder; the strategies of supporting pupils' motor skills, including modelling, shaping, chaining and prompting and the assessment record and motor skills difficulties checklists, which will enhance my interventions effectively.

Teaching Assistant
Dyspraxia and Motor Coordination Difficulties

This course has really opened my eyes to children, the way they move and organise themselves in the school environment. On learning walks around school I can now see with really fresh eyes. I am also able to contribute to discussions with the SENCO about the nature of the difficulties some children are experiencing. I would like any SEND governors that I meet to undertake this course and any of the other OLT course. They are invaluable to all colleagues working in the school environment. I have also made contact with the local Physio and OT team on behalf of school. Great networking opportunities...

Consultant
Dyspraxia and Motor Coordination Difficulties

This training has had a huge impact on how I communicate and teach learners with SLCN. I can identify individual learners needs and adapt lessons so that they can understand the tasks given to complete, feel confident in their own abilities and not be afraid to ask for help when needed.

Teaching Assistant
Speech, Language and Communication Needs

This course has helped me understand there are many different eye conditions. I am more aware of the individual daily challenges. I think I'm now in a better position to assist students and I have learned new support strategies. I would recommend this course to others.

Learning Support Assistant
Vision Impairment

Before starting this course, I had no knowledge of dyslexia. I thought it was just a case of ‘swimming letters’ when trying to read and confusing b and d and p and q when writing. I now realise that there is much more to it than just these possible traits I have learnt the importance of a dyslexia friendly workplace. We try to make our classrooms as appealing as possible to the majority of students, but fail to take into account the needs of a dyslexic pupil. Something as simple as changing the background on the smartboard from white to buff could make a huge difference. Labelling trays with images rather than just words could save everybody's time, rather than just that of our struggling pupils.

Teaching Assistant
Dyslexia

Providing structured choices throughout the school day is a strategy I have adopted with children who have a need to exert control. These are often children who have experienced a lack of control and autonomy in their early years. Providing them with regular opportunities to make choices and control their immediate environment can assist in avoiding power battles and oppositional behaviour. The choices do not need to be big or significant to have an impact on the child’s experience of the classroom.

Teacher
Attachment and Trauma

I will use what I have learnt to provide input when preparing plans for a child’s learning. I have much more confidence when thinking of interventions to put in place.

Teaching Assistant
Autism Spectrum Disorder

I can write more specific targets using SMART after the face to face training. My tutor used the example of an iceberg which was helpful in understanding underlying difficulties to aid target writing.

Teaching Assistant
Learning Strategies

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